and the people floated away.

A red boudoir

in the earth’s ax to bruit upon her branches

leaving in skull-white redress, neck

covered in frost; shyness is halved

in father’s seed from his to his daughter;

in the cherry tree slaught with black doves

arched in mad gaze, the fire flower from

firethorns strayed like ossification in

a pomegranate womb, and shook with death,

sobered in sea-

sick with the heir of our ghosts

for the sleeping black rose, thorns

as whispering monarchies wearing their human suits,

kenning blood into their blood, fathers of daughters,

mothers of seas then buried,

leapt to death in ocean oasis,

why tear the head off of the bird?

too brutal for me when we

can watch instead like the madmen we are.

© 2020 lucysworks.com All Rights Reserved.


Written for the dVerse prompt:

Tonight, I want to give you the title for your poem, and let you do the rest.

I want you to choose from one of these titles:

  • Travelling in the wilderness
  • She said if a red fox had crossed somewhere, that area was safe
  • They say only the south wind flattens grass
  • We are teachers to our grandchildren
  • Lead dogs are very smart
  • Squirrel hunting in the mountains
  • A story of when the ice detached and the people floated away.

This is a very horrific poem to me in what I describe. The meaning, to me, as I base off of emotion is in the final two lines.

For something not as depressing, feel free to look at this picture of my Haji:

  43 comments for “and the people floated away.

  1. December 1, 2020 at 3:52 pm

    I agree… those last two lines really jumped out at me as well… I read in this how we are all complicit in a way.
    “when we
    can watch instead like the madmen we are.”
    To me this is a horrific thought (and maybe true)

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 1, 2020 at 8:43 pm

      Thank you. That really is the essence of the poem.

      Like

  2. December 1, 2020 at 4:04 pm

    Some great images here, Lucy. I particularly liked that pomegranate womb. The ending is suddenly sobering and direct, it’s a great contrast with the verbal complexity of the rest of the poem.

    Liked by 2 people

    • December 1, 2020 at 8:43 pm

      Thank you so much, Sarah.

      Like

  3. December 1, 2020 at 4:33 pm

    Disturbing in graphic imagery, then your conclusion, is it any wonder we’re all stark-raving mad under such cruelty?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. sanaarizvi
    December 1, 2020 at 5:44 pm

    “in the cherry tree slaught with black doves arched in mad gaze, the fire flower from firethorns strayed like ossification in a pomegranate womb,”…. this poem is incredibly rich in imagery! 😀 Wow! 💝💝

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 1, 2020 at 8:44 pm

      Thank you so much!

      Like

  5. December 1, 2020 at 8:30 pm

    A compelling and mind-stirring piece! I love the pic of your Haji.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. December 1, 2020 at 11:13 pm

    Sometimes I think we are all carried away on a broken off ice flow and the worlds craziness keeps showing itself. Spectator’s one and all yet still complicit! Well done Lucy!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. December 2, 2020 at 12:50 am

    Some really visceral, disturbing images here Lucy. Nice to see your beautiful cat at the end as a counterbalance like you said 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  8. December 2, 2020 at 1:15 am

    Dark and unsettling and the last two lines are sadly really true. I loved it! ❤️ :))

    Liked by 1 person

  9. December 2, 2020 at 3:54 am

    There’s so much interest here! For example:

    ‘as whispering monarchies wearing their human suits,

    kenning blood into their blood, fathers of daughters,

    mothers of seas then buried,’

    Wow! I think you understand the undertow of our age…

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 2, 2020 at 1:09 pm

      Thank you so very much. I am quite cynical of the world and I think it shows. 😀

      Like

  10. December 2, 2020 at 4:14 am

    The part of the title you chose works so well, Lucy, as a title for your poem, which is indeed horrific. I love the clever word- and winter-colour-play in the opening lines, with the ‘red boudoir’, the ‘skull-white redress’ and ‘neck covered in frost’, and the way it turns darker in the ‘cherry tree slaught with black doves’. I also like the ‘pomegranate womb’.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. December 2, 2020 at 4:45 am

    a poem full of gothic imagery
    “in the cherry tree slaught with black doves

    arched in mad gaze”

    (interesting word ‘slaught’)

    and that punchy ending pulls us in from reader to voyeur

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 2, 2020 at 1:10 pm

      Thank you dearly, Laura!

      Like

  12. mariamichaela
    December 2, 2020 at 6:53 am

    The title reminds me of the book and film “It”. Well woven, Lucy.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. December 2, 2020 at 8:47 am

    The image that strikes me most here is being seasick with the heirs of ghosts. Read aloud it contains even more worlds. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  14. December 2, 2020 at 12:22 pm

    I love your cat! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. December 2, 2020 at 12:34 pm

    This struck me as a piece about trauma Lucy. The way we are all traumatized by the brutality and indifference that surrounds us. Once again I enjoyed taking this verbal ride with you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 2, 2020 at 1:02 pm

      Thank you, Rob. I agree with you very much on your analysis. It’s spot-on.

      Like

  16. Sherry Marr
    December 2, 2020 at 1:29 pm

    Wow! So powerful, especially those two closing lines. Like the madmen we are. Yes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 2, 2020 at 4:00 pm

      Thank you so much!

      Like

  17. December 2, 2020 at 2:01 pm

    So powerful and the end is a stark reckoning.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. December 3, 2020 at 6:51 am

    It’s interesting, Lucy: We watch and observe, vicariously, and then disavow our direct participation, but it cuts into us just as deeply as if our hand held the moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    • December 15, 2020 at 2:15 am

      Very true. Thank you so much!

      Like

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