eyelids.

eyelids
and a lie i stare
the way footsteps
slip

in winters etcetera
of the garden; the most frail
are knifed apples of eve

in my hands roots
faces I hid because I’m a memorial now
not the child
with arias in my bones

© 2021 lucysworks.com All Rights Reserved. 

Written for the dVerse prompt: Use the word way in a quadrille.


  54 comments for “eyelids.

  1. January 25, 2021 at 3:14 pm

    I see the image of Ophelia lying in the water seeing her last breath slipping away.

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:27 pm

      I can now see that too! Thank you for the feedback. ❤

      Like

  2. January 25, 2021 at 3:22 pm

    I enjoyed the seemingly disjointed stream of consciousness of your quadrille, Lucy, which has stunning imagery in ‘the way footsteps slip in winters etcetera’, the ‘knifed apples of eve’ and the arias in bones. The speaker in this poem could still be saved.

    Liked by 3 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:28 pm

      They very well can. As dark as my poems are with the topics they delve into, that is one aspect that is always there: Hope.

      Thank you for your feedback, Kim. It is always appreciated. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  3. January 25, 2021 at 3:29 pm

    ‘not the child/with arias in my bones’ – this was heartbreaking to me, Lucy, and so haunting!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. January 25, 2021 at 3:33 pm

    I was so into this that I didn’t even notice the word “way” anywhere until I went back. As others have said, “not the child with arias in my bones” is so very telling and hits to the bottom of the soul. Just an amazing write, Lucy!

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:29 pm

      Hahaha! Well, I must have done my job right if you didn’t notice it right away. 😀

      Thank you so much, Lillian. I am honored to hear it.

      Like

    • January 26, 2021 at 2:56 am

      That’s exactly what happened to me too! This was such an engrossing poem!

      -David

      Liked by 1 person

  5. January 25, 2021 at 3:34 pm

    I feel the reflection, perhaps regret within this piece. So interesting to explore each line further with interpretation. Wonderful word choices with “etcetera” and “arias”.

    Liked by 3 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:30 pm

      It’s definitely a reflection of memories with how I interpreted it when writing (and I always like to say that to me, the best interpretation is the reader’s). Thank you so much. ❤ ❤

      Like

  6. January 25, 2021 at 3:56 pm

    That last line is a killer (so to speak)… Love this one!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. January 25, 2021 at 4:03 pm

    “winters etcetera of the garden” and “knifed apples of Eve” such rich terms, Lucy. You create a world within a few words. Excellent!

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:33 pm

      Oh wow, I am so happy to hear that. Just 44 words and it’s rough to create a landscape, you know? I always try and I am happy you think I can create such a world. You do as well with masterful imagery and color; the detail is impeccable from your color-wheel of words in their world. ❤ ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • January 25, 2021 at 6:08 pm

        Yes, it is a fun challenge to build with 44 worlds and you surely did. Thanks for the kind words, Lucy.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Glenn A. Buttkus
    January 25, 2021 at 4:07 pm

    Alive or dead, metaphor or reality, your narrator could be both or neither. I liked “faces I hid because I’m a memorial now” and “eyelids and a lie”.

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:34 pm

      Eh, I’m betting money the narrator is emotionally alive but feels dead if that makes sense. I wanted to gather topics of regret, memories, and sadness; and I loved how you picked up on the emotional connections I intended. Thank you so much, as always, for the lovely feedback.

      Like

  9. January 25, 2021 at 4:16 pm

    Arias! Ah I’ll pine for that narrow!

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:34 pm

      You definitely should! 😁

      Like

  10. January 25, 2021 at 4:46 pm

    Yes, ‘in winter’s etcetera / of the garden’ is a wonderful line – both discarding the description (we’ve all seen such snow-bound gardens) and the ridiculous involuntary shiver of the cold. Another engaging read – thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:36 pm

      I love how you interpreted it, Peter, as I often love to connect the cold in my poems. I’m glad you found this engaging, I must rather thank you! 😁

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Beverly Crawford
    January 25, 2021 at 4:59 pm

    Your poems never fail to challenge me, Lucy!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Beverly Crawford
    January 25, 2021 at 4:59 pm

    Your poems never fail to challenge me, Lucy!

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 5:37 pm

      I will take that as a compliment. 😀

      I merely joke, Beverly. I’m happy to hear that and I thank you for such words. It pushes me to go further beyond my writing capabilities in some ways. I thank you for that.

      Like

  13. January 25, 2021 at 6:11 pm

    The progression to ‘Not the child with arias in her bones’
    Makes for a sad kind of nostalgia
    A very interesting quadrille

    Much💖love

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 9:19 pm

      I agree with you, there’s a sad nostalgia I put in. Thank you so much!

      Like

  14. January 25, 2021 at 6:55 pm

    Such a grand entrance into your poem, that had me slipping into read more….🖤
    “eyelids
    and a lie i stare
    the way footsteps
    slip”

    Liked by 1 person

  15. January 25, 2021 at 7:28 pm

    Children with arias in their bones …. what a beautiful fantasy/reality. Lovely arias, soaring arias, forever arias.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. January 25, 2021 at 8:29 pm

    “eyelids” — That first word standing alone, and I imagine eyes that refuse to open, refuse to allow anyone to see into the soul behind them.

    Liked by 3 people

    • January 25, 2021 at 9:20 pm

      That is exactly how I thought of the first few lines. Hiding and not wanting to be seen. Thank you so much for your interpretation, it’s what I had in mind too. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. January 25, 2021 at 10:20 pm

    …the most frail among us are the knifed apples of eve…
    What a great line to describe the death of the elderly! No left with nothing but roots and memories. Makes one grow up very fast!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. January 26, 2021 at 5:51 am

    I see that Ken already said what I wanted to say! I loved this masterpiece, Lucy 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  19. January 26, 2021 at 6:46 am

    This poem is everything! So engaging, I was hooked from start to finish 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  20. January 26, 2021 at 9:56 am

    Lucy, this is stunning.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. January 26, 2021 at 12:15 pm

    I feel like the speaker has somewhat removed herself emotionally behind those eyelids in the beginning, just observing the way it all came undone. A look back at innocence. Nicely done! 👏💕

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 26, 2021 at 4:19 pm

      Definitely! I had those themes in mind too. Thank you so much.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. January 26, 2021 at 12:51 pm

    “knifed apples of eve”
    Love this phrase Lucy! Kick ass piece, once again…

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 26, 2021 at 4:19 pm

      Thank you, Rob! 😀

      Like

  23. January 26, 2021 at 1:27 pm

    So evocative with layers of meaning, Lucy. It invites the reader’s empathy in a remarkable way. Funny, but “eyelids” are the first thing you look for in a marbled statue or over a sarcophagus.

    Liked by 2 people

    • January 26, 2021 at 4:18 pm

      Thank you, and that really is funny. I had no idea about that!

      Liked by 1 person

  24. January 26, 2021 at 5:33 pm

    The gravestone of a child is always chilling. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  25. January 27, 2021 at 11:36 am

    This is stunning. It echoes with every word and when the last word is read. it keeps echoing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 27, 2021 at 7:26 pm

      Thank you so much!

      Like

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